Master Baboon The sea of the simulation

3May/092

My AI reads your mind and kicks your ass (part 2)

Get Adobe Flash player

In the last post I discussed how it is possible to program a game Artificial Intelligence to exploit a player's unconscious biases using a simple mathematical model. In the karate game above, the AI uses that model in order to do the largest amount of damage. Give it a try! You get 10 points if you hit your opponent with a punch or a kick, 0 points if you miss, and 5 points if you block your opponent's move. As you play, the AI learns your strategy and adapts to knock you down as often as possible.

How does it work? According to decision theory, we need to maximize the expected score. To compute the expected score for an action 'x' (e.g., 'punch'), one needs to consider all possible player's moves, 'y', and weight the possible outcome with the probability of the player doing that move, i.e.

E[score for x] = sum_y P(y) * Score(y,x)

where P(y) is the probability of the player choosing action 'y' (obtained using last post's model), and Score(y,x) gives the score of responding 'x' to 'y'.

For example, in the karate game using a low kick has a priori the highest chance of success: you score in 3 out of 4 cases, and only lose 5 points if the opponent decides to block your kick. This is why, at the beginning, the AI tends to choose that move. However, if you know that the AI uses that move often, you will choose the kick-blocking move more often, increasing P(kick-block). This change will make the punch more likely to score points. As you play, the optimal strategy changes and the AI continues to adapt to your style.

With a bit of practice, you'll notice that you can compete with the AI and sometimes even gain the upper hand over it. This shows that you are in turn forming an internal model of the computer's strategy. I think that the game dynamics that results from this interaction makes the game quite interesting, even though it is extremely simple. Unfortunately, it's very rare to see learning AIs in real-life video games...

As always, you can download the code here.

Update: Instead of always making the best move, the AI now selects the move with a probability related to its score, which makes it less predictable. More details in the next post...

[ad#adpost]

23Apr/093

My AI reads your mind (part 1)

I regularly read about people complaining that AI in games should be improved. I definitely agree with them, but here's a argument why pushing it to the limits might not be such a good idea: computers can easily discover and exploit our unconscious biases.

Magic? ESP? More like a simple application of decision theory. In order to make an unbeatable AI one needs two steps: 1) build a model of a player's response in order to predict his next move, and 2) choose actions that maximize the expected score given the prediction of the model.

The basic idea behind 1) is that even if we try to be unpredictable, our actions contain hidden patterns that can be revealed using a pinch of statistics. Formally, the model takes the form of a probability distribution: P(next move | past observations).

Try it out: In the Flash example below, you can type in a sequence numbers 1-4, and the AI will try to predict your next choice. If your choices were completely random, the AI would only be able to guess correctly 25% of the time. In practice, it often guesses correctly 35-40% of the numbers! (It might take a few numbers before the AI starts doing a decent job.)

Get Adobe Flash player

In this example I used a 2nd order Markov model, i.e., I assumed that the next number, n(t+1), only depends on the past 2 choices: P(n(t+1) | past observations) = P(n(t+1) | n(t), n(t-1)). The rest is just book-keeping: I used two arrays, one to remember the past 3 numbers, and one to keep track of how many times the player chose number 'k', given that his past two moves were 'i' and 'j':

1
2
3
4
5
// last 3 moves
public var history:Array = [1, 3, 2];
// transition table: transitions[i,j,k] stores the number
// of time the player pressed 'i' followed by 'j' followed by 'k'
public var transitions:Array;

When the player makes a new choice, I update the history, and increment the corresponding entry in the transition table:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
/*
* Update history and transition tables with player's move.
*/

public function update(move:int):void {
history = [history[1], history[2], move];
transitions[history[0]][history[1]][history[2]] += 1;
}

The probability that the next choice will be n(t+1), is given by the number of times the player pressed n(t+1) after n(t) and n(t-1) before, normalized by the number of time the sequence n(t-1), n(t) occurred in the past:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
/*
* Return probability distribution for next move.
*/

public function predict():Array {
// probability distribution over next move
var prob:Array = new Array(4);

// look up previous transitions from moves at time t-2, t-1
var tr:Array = transitions[history[1]][history[2]];

// normalizing constant
var sum:Number = 0;
for (var k:int = 0; k < 4; k++) {
sum += tr[k];
}

for (k = 0; k < 4; k++) {
prob[k] = tr[k] / sum;
}

return prob;
}

The best prediction is given by the choice with maximum probability. You're welcome to have a look at the code!

In the next post, I'll show how the AI can choose the best actions in order to maximize its expected score in a Virtual Karate game.

[ad#adpost]